January 2020

  • The International Center for Biosaline Agriculture (ICBA) has started testing a unique greenhouse prototype which uses saline groundwater and seawater to grow food.
    The International Center for Biosaline Agriculture (ICBA) has started testing a unique greenhouse prototype which uses saline groundwater and seawater to grow food.
  • The system is currently being tested, and if successful, it will prove a great way to reduce pressure on scarce freshwater resources in marginal environments and boost food production, especially in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region.
    The system is currently being tested, and if successful, it will prove a great way to reduce pressure on scarce freshwater resources in marginal environments and boost food production, especially in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region.
  • The system features an environmentally-friendly technology in which, at one end, saline water passes through a porous wall made of pozzolan bricks, and, at the other end, fans suck in air from outside through a cold wall, thus creating a cooling effect inside the greenhouse.
    The system features an environmentally-friendly technology in which, at one end, saline water passes through a porous wall made of pozzolan bricks, and, at the other end, fans suck in air from outside through a cold wall, thus creating a cooling effect inside the greenhouse.
ICBA starts testing saltwater-based greenhouse prototype
Monday, 20 January, 2020

The International Center for Biosaline Agriculture (ICBA) has started testing a unique greenhouse prototype which uses saline groundwater and seawater to grow food.

  • The International Center for Biosaline Agriculture (ICBA) is helping a group of farmers in Al Khatim and Al Khazna in the emirate of Abu Dhabi, the UAE, to utilize reject brine for cultivating fish and a halophytic (salt-loving) plant called Salicornia.
    The International Center for Biosaline Agriculture (ICBA) is helping a group of farmers in Al Khatim and Al Khazna in the emirate of Abu Dhabi, the UAE, to utilize reject brine for cultivating fish and a halophytic (salt-loving) plant called Salicornia.
  • All farms are currently growing Salicornia, and four of them are equipped with an inland modular farming system, in which reject brine is used for raising tilapia, and aquaculture effluents for irrigating Salicornia.
    All farms are currently growing Salicornia, and four of them are equipped with an inland modular farming system, in which reject brine is used for raising tilapia, and aquaculture effluents for irrigating Salicornia.
Farmers in Abu Dhabi start using reject brine to grow fish, halophyte
Wednesday, 15 January, 2020

The International Center for Biosaline Agriculture (ICBA) is helping a group of farmers in Al Khatim and Al Khazna in the emirate of Abu Dhabi, the UAE, to utilize reject brine for cultivating fish and a halophytic (salt-loving) plant called Salicornia.

  • The Emirates Soil Museum is designed to raise awareness, especially among youth, about the threats to soils and the significant role healthy soils play in meeting the current and future food needs worldwide.
    The Emirates Soil Museum is designed to raise awareness, especially among youth, about the threats to soils and the significant role healthy soils play in meeting the current and future food needs worldwide.
  • Moreover, the museum hosted several tree-planting events throughout the year, which were also linked with the Year of Tolerance in the UAE and in which more than 600 trees such as Ghaf, Acacia, Ziziphus (Sidr), and Moringa were planted.
    Moreover, the museum hosted several tree-planting events throughout the year, which were also linked with the Year of Tolerance in the UAE and in which more than 600 trees such as Ghaf, Acacia, Ziziphus (Sidr), and Moringa were planted.
Emirates Soil Museum attracts over 4,000 visitors
Friday, 10 January, 2020

Over the past three years, the Emirates Soil Museum, based on the premises of the International Center for Biosaline Agriculture (ICBA) in Dubai, the UAE, has attracted more than 4,000 visitors, including ministers, policymakers, researchers, farmers, and students from around the world.